Super acai berries

A bit about acai

Acai berries, previously considered an exotic fruit, have now become a virtual staple in almost every supermarket’s collection of health foods and supplements.

No longer the sole preserve of health stores and delis, these nutrient-dense berries have become increasingly popular in the form of dietary supplements, food powders, shakes and juice boosters. But why?

This growth in use and popularity is in no small part due to the significant media attention they have received, since being more widely recognised in the West as a “superfruit”. In other words, a fruit with an exceptionally high nutrient-to-calorie ratio compared to other fruits of a similar kind. For example, in terms of antioxidant, essential fatty acid, vitamin or mineral content.

Although having only just relatively recently entered the wider public consciousness, South Americans native to the Amazon have been enjoying the health benefits of these tasty berries for many years. In fact, they are considered to be an essential food source for three traditional Caboclo populations in the Brazilian Amazon, because they make up a major component of their diet – up to 42% of their total food intake by weight! A fact which reflects their incredibly high nutrient content.

Found only in swampy areas of the Amazon rainforest (Central and South America), acai berries are pretty rare – which explains why they hadn’t popped up on supermarket shelves before. They are small and round (approximately 25mm in size) and grow on large palm trees called açaí palms, which can reach over 80 feet in height. The berries grow in bunches (similar to bananas) and an average açaí palm tree can yield between 3 to 8 bunches of berries.

Once ripe, acai berries bear a strong resemblance to grapes and blueberries, except that they are not quite as pulpy. They contain a large, inedible seed, which constitutes as much as 90% of the entire fruit – yet another reason they weren’t more widely cultivated as a culinary fruit.

Acai nutrition

As mentioned above, although hard to find in their natural whole food form, everyone can now fortunately access the nutritional benefits of these berries on a daily basis through the convenience of health supplements. Food-based powders and food form supplement capsules now often incorporate both acai berry powder and concentrated extract. But why might you want to incorporate acai berry nutrients into your daily diet?

Immune system support:
A big clue to their high nutrient content is given away by the deep blue / purple colour of acai berries. Like most other brightly coloured foods found in nature, they contain natural pigments, which support immunity, health and vitality. For example, flavonoids and potent antioxidants (such as anthocyanins). They are also a rich source of Omega 6 and Omega 9 fatty acids (healthy fats).

Heart health support:
As well as containing high levels of anthocyanins, research has also shown that acai berries are rich in phytosterols, which may provide cardio-protective support for our cells.

Energy support:
Relatively speaking, acai berries contain high levels of plant protein. Combined with their high levels of antioxidants and other nutrients, they can offer ideal support for high energy levels, stamina and general vitality.

Weight management support:
When trying to shape up, you are obviously looking to decrease your intake of high-calorie unhealthy foods, in favour of nutrient-packed foods that are naturally low in calories. Not only will this promote a healthy weight, it will also help to ensure that your general health remains strong during any periods of slimming and reduced food choice. In this way, acai berries can provide ideal weight management support as part of an overall balanced diet.

So now you know a little bit about why acai berries have been causing a stir in the natural health world. And these are just some of their nutritional benefits. Plus, if you favour an organic lifestyle or are trying to detox, it is worth bearing in mind that acai berries are wild harvested, as opposed to farmed. This means that they aren’t exposed to the harmful pesticides and fertilisers so often found in other fruit and vegetables.

They offer great all-round healthy living support, so why not try them for yourself!

For more information, visit our main website

Beetroot nutrition

So you think you know all about the humble beetroot – the root vegetable so often found in pantries since World War II. But you might be surprised to learn that it is so much more than just a pickle. It is actually a nutritional powerhouse, now widely regarded as a “superfood”, and best friend to those who engage in high-intensity, stamina and endurance exercise.

Beetroot history

The beetroot is no stranger to the average household. Also known as “table beet”, it is one of the many cultivated varieties of Beta vulgaris and the most common variety found in Britain, North America and Central America today.

In the earliest days of its consumption, the leaves were most commonly eaten by people living in the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East. The Romans then began to make use of the root for various medicinal purposes. Over the years, it became popular in Central and Eastern Europe for culinary purposes too.

Beetroot, as we know it today, was only cultivated in the 16th century. Interestingly, modern varieties are derived from the sea beet, an inedible plant that grows wild along the coasts of Europe, North Africa and Asia.

An unlikely “super” hero

Unlike some of the other, better known superfoods, like wheatgrass, barley grass, spirulina or acai berry, beetroot is not particularly exotic. But don’t let that fool you.

What has traditionally been viewed as a boring, somewhat unappetising vegetable, is really a “super-root” in disguise.

It is a rich source of both carbohydrates and plant proteins, along with a broad spectrum of vitamins, minerals and other essential nutrients.

At the same time, it has a very low caloric value and is almost entirely free of fat. It is also a low-GI food – the sugar conversion process is slow, which supports stable blood sugar levels.

Beetroot antioxidants

You can’t have failed to notice the vivid colour of beetroot – whether the deep purple, the bright yellow  or the lesser seen candy-stripes. Like so many other superfoods, these colours offer a visual clue as to the high level of antioxidants, carotenoids and flavonoids found in beetroot as a result of its pigment.

The notorious red colour compound is called betanin (or beetroot red), a pigment which is a well-known antioxidant and phyto-chemical. However, all beets contain betalain antioxidants – a class of red and yellow pigments found in plants.

Vitamins and minerals in beetroot

Beetroot is also rich in a broad spectrum of vitamins and minerals, contributing to its classification as a superfood. For instance, it contains high levels of folate and vitamin C (another powerful antioxidant), as well as riboflavin, niacin and thiamin, vitamin K, calcium, silica, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc and iron.

Dietary fibre

Beetroot is high in dietary fibre – both soluble and insoluble. A 100g portion – about two or three small beetroot – contains as much as 10% of the recommended daily allowance.

Fibre is an essential component of healthy digestion and supports everything from stable blood sugar levels to natural cleanse and detox processes in the body.

Dietary nitrate

More recently, a lot of research has been undertaken on beetroot’s capacity to absorb and store exceptionally high levels of nitrate – a nutrient involved in many of the processes that are essential for efficient exercise performance, including blood flow and oxygen usage.

In particular, a study conducted by Exeter University in the UK received a high level of media attention when it found that cyclists who drank a half-litre of beetroot juice several hours before setting off were able to ride up to 20% longer than those who drank a placebo blackcurrant juice.

Since that study, both beetroot and beetroot supplements have been of particular interest to athletes.

Supporting general health and vitality

The unique combination of nutrients found in beetroot mean that it can offer ideal support for general health and vitality, including:

  • a healthy heart and cholesterol levels
  • detoxification and liver function
  • a strong immune system
  • healthy homocysteine levels
  • normal tissue growth
  • musculo-skeletal health
  • healthy skin, hair and nails
  • stable blood sugar levels
  • stamina and energy levels
  • stable moods
  • and healthy digestion.

Belonging to the same family as two other nutritional titans, chard and spinach, both the leaves and roots of beetroot can be eaten. Incorporate it into your daily diet and your body will thank you.

For more information, visit our main website

Hemp seed protein powder

Making a big difference with hemp seed protein powder

You will not believe how easy it is to make a huge difference to your health with the help of hemp seed protein.

If you are looking for a diet supplement that works for the long term, hemp seed protein is it. It is loaded with tonnes of essential amino acids and many of the nutrients our bodies need to keep us healthy.

How to create a blend that provides you with the most benefits for the least amount of effort?

The first thing you need to do when selecting your protein supplement is to find the best hemp protein powder – natural, balanced, high quality and free from added nasties.

There are many places you can go to find good quality protein powder. Many online stores and nutritional supplement companies sell products that use natural sources. For maximum benefit, there should be no artificial preservatives or colours in your chosen powder.

Hemp is also known as Cannabutter. It comes from the seeds of the hemp plant which is also the source of many of the vitamins and minerals found in traditional diets.

So now you better understand the ingredient that you will be using and what you need to look for when you are looking for the right hemp protein powder.

Maximising the benefits of hemp seed protein powder

After you have decided on the blend that is right for you, you need to ensure that you include it in your daily diet at least four times per day (or as advised) for maximum benefit, i.e. increased protein and nutrient intake from a quality source.

The next step is to make sure that you use your shake at breakfast, lunch and in the afternoon. Consuming the powder right before you go to bed will not have as much of an effect as drinking it right before you start your day.

The final step in making sure that you get the most out of your shake is to make sure that you always drink a glass of water with each serving of protein powder. This will help to keep you hydrated, will balance out any dietary fibre intake and will also help to flush out toxins.

You will soon see that you are losing weight and feeling great throughout the day by simply incorporating this nutritious superfood into your daily diet.

For more information, visit our main website

Item added to cart.
0 items - £0.00